ARTIST ARCHIVE

ARTIST OF THE MONTH - ARCHIVE

18Karat Studio + Gallery is proud to have represented many established and up-and-coming Canadian artists, many of whom we have interviewed as part of our ARTIST OF THE MONTH series. Here you will find an archive of all of these past interviews. Enjoy!
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BANDE DES QUATRES CAROLINE ARBOUR DOMINIQUE AUDETTE LINDA BROWN
JOHN CARNES CHRISTINE DWAYNE DINO GIANNETTI BAYOT HEER
JESPER JENSEN JANIS KERMAN PETRA LUZ CLAUDIO PINO
MEREDITH ROBB CARLOS SOTO DEBORAH VIVAS

October 24, 2017

The Origin Story

Janis and Erin are the mother-daughter duo behind Bande Des Quatres, a brand conceived on a family vacation while designing accessories for Erin to wear to her NYU senior thesis exhibition. Her outfit was Michael Jackson inspired and required statement jewellery to match her gold sequin pants - thus the Van der Rohe and Moholy-Nagy rings came to life! These rings each extend across four fingers, giving way to the name Bande Des Quatres, French for “Band of Four”. The floating illusion these rings created was always a conversation starter, pushing Erin to develop the brand and a debut collection, with Janis as the maker. Two masterminds, one vision!


The ring that started it all, the Van der Rohe - sterling silver, oxidized sterling silver.

Inspirations

Art and design are the biggest sources of inspiration for Bande Des Quatres. Janis and Erin draw from a wide variety of styles, periods and media - from photography to sculpture, painting, architecture, graphic and industrial design. As Georgia O’Keefe said, “colours and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Taking her cue, BDQ celebrates the purely visual, relying on colours, shapes and lines to create their unique designs. From Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, BDQ draws from the philosophy of learning by experimentation, inviting their followers to wear these elements, this history and heritage on the body.

Every Bande Des Quatres piece is named after the artist or architect whose style inspired it:
Collection I, Bauhaus Masters
Collection II, Architects
Collection III, Abstract Photographers
Collection IV, Minimalist Artists
Collection V, Typography


Collection I: Bauhaus Masters - Stolzl ring


Collection III: Abstract Photographers - Harry ring


Collection IV: Minimalist Artists - Francois necklace


Collection V: Typography - Christian ring

Working Together
Each design is a collaboration: conceived by Erin and hand-crafted by her mother Janis. Erin describes working together as truly a gift - she is always full of ideas and Janis knows exactly how to translate them! Their design process begins by deciding on an art-based theme for a new collection, and from there they start putting pen to paper. The next step is to play a bit of dress up by using paper models to see how the new pieces could look when worn, and then the ideas are transformed to metal. Once each piece is finalized it is named based on the theme and the artist who inspired it.


Mariah earrings - sterling silver, oxidized sterling silver.

Functional Creativity

Bande Des Quatres celebrates illusion in adornment and redefines the conventions of traditional jewellery. The pieces are adaptable and functional - although initially developed for individuals with an interest in edgy art and fashion, many of the rings are also exceptionally comfortable on arthritic fingers! In this way there is something for everyone in BDQ jewellery.

Creating for BDQ is a time for the design duo to bring together their individual and joint art influences and blend them. Having lived together for 18 years, Janis and Erin have had the opportunity to enjoy a wide variety of art, fashion and design and learn to communicate and translate elements that attract them without words. This is the wunderful benefit of being a mother-daughter team.


Hadid ring - sterling silver, oxidized sterling silver, 18k yellow gold, black diamonds.


Janis and Erin in the studio, always creating!

Thank you Bande des Quatres for your impressive work and joyful interview! For more examples of their work click here.

July 31, 2018

Brilliant, brave and strong - Caroline Arbour is inspired by not just the appearance of the beetle, but also by what it has represented throughout history. Fascinated by their agility, their colours and their anatomy these creatures have come to play a creative role in Caroline’s life and work that is both mystical and mythical.


Caroline Arbour of SCARO

“As a contemporary jeweler, the beetle is my alter ego. As an artist, I am sensitive to my surroundings and fragile at times. And as a businesswoman, I have little room for this sensitivity. The beetle’s shell is mine and it protects me. The beetle’s shell does not prevent it from shining, from being proud and hardworking.”

Q: What is your origin story?

There are moments that change our lives. One such moment was my discovery of the beetle, the coleopterous insect that took an unlikely place in my life. Even my business is no exception and is called SCARO, a combination of scarab and Caroline. I was studying jewelry-making at the Pavillon technique in Quebec City when I spotted this extraordinary creature. On a beautiful summer day, I saw a beetle walking calmly along the hot asphalt. Fascinated by its agility, I stopped the car that was about to run it over. I bent down to pick up this long-horned beetle, hid it in the palm of my hand and observed it for several minutes. Brown in texture with motifs, somewhat shiny, brave and strong. From then on, the jewelry I sculpted would be in the form of beetles. It is more than just a simple fascination; I grew to respect this mythical and mystical insect. As a contemporary jeweler, the beetle is my alter ego. As an artist, I am sensitive to my surroundings and fragile at times. The beetle’s shell is mine and it protects me. The beetle’s shell does not prevent it from shining, from being proud and hardworking. Like the beetle, when I am confident, I break out of my shell and spread my wings. This is when I may seem a little clumsy and maybe even a bit loud, like the beetle who, while flying, notices the buzzing sound of his wings beating against his shell. But he keeps going and manages to reach his target. That's the image of a beetle flying free! Since 1998, the beetle has followed me everywhere…I have even tattooed it on my skin! Every day I sculpt, shape and polish them and insert precious stones. Each day I wear it proudly as one of my creations. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do.


Genuine beetle elytra.

Q: How did you first get started making jewellery?

When I was young, one night I dreamed about making jewelry. I was already a very creative kid but from that night, I knew that this was my destiny to create jewelry and it was going to be my way to express myself to the world.

Q: Tell us about your work process - what materials and processes do you favour?

SCARO jewelry is entirely handmade in Quebec in my workshop in Abitibi-Témiscamingue. To obtain the desired effects, I work my metals using one or both of the following traditional techniques:
Lost Wax: Using this technique, I create complex shapes and volumes. Skilled in sculpture, I favour this technique to sculpt beetle’s bodies, but also to produce very detailed rings and bangles. Pendants, bracelets, earrings and other jewelry can also be made using this thousand-year-old technique.
Directly in the metal: Using a nugget, I create an ingot that I will transform into a plaque or a thread of different thicknesses. I use this technique for many of my creations. This method requires many tools and a lot of patience and dexterity. I also regularly combine these two techniques to make a single item of jewelry, such as my beetles, where the legs and setting are made in the metal itself and the body is made in lost wax.


Galuchat Necklace - Stingray leather is fascinating in its great beauty and toughness - a mix of force and elegance.

Q: What do you think makes your work unique?

My emblem, the beetle. For SCARO, the beetle is a good-luck charm. It symbolizes inner strength, with its shell serving as a protector and invoking courage. The insertion of genuine beetle elytra with iridescent highlights in SCARO’s jewellery adds a touch of real magic. I hope that my creations will bring strength and happiness. As for a good-luck charm, I mould my beetles so that each of them envelops beauty, courage and abundance for those who wear them. SCARO is more than jewelry – it is also an emotion to be worn…

Q: Where do you gather inspiration?

With my sharp eye and endlessly renewed inspiration, I harness the fragile, poetic beauty of my surroundings. While insects are the focus of my fascination with living beings, I also see beauty in the variegated textures of plant life that I transform, through filing, moulding and welding, into jewellery or works of art, forged in precious metals. I really enjoy playing with contrasts, mixing smooth, round pearls with rougher materials and textures.


Caroline hand-sculpting a beetle ring.

Q: What artists have inspired you the most - who do you look up to?

I am fascinated by the extravagance of haute couture and the excesses the fashion world indulges in. I like free, strong and daring spirits like Jean-Paul Gaultier who is a passionate and uncompromising being. I always admired as well the work of Boucheron and Lalique who are significant sources of inspiration for me.


Q: What are the most valuable lessons you’ve learned from working in the industry?

Don’t follow the trends, trust your own instinct.

Q: What tips do you have for aspiring designers?

Always remains authentic.

Q: Do you have a motto or a credo - something that defines your work?

Life is more intense and fulfilling when you do not care about what others think.

A big thank you to Caroline for inspiring us with your design journey! For more examples of Caroline's work click here. Caroline is part of the exhibition "BIOPHILIA: Expressions in Metal", click here to find out more.

BIOPHILIA - Featured Artist : Dominique Audette

September 4th, 2018

Dominique Audette is a Québec-based jewellery artist whose work is inspired by the artistic movements of the 20th century, especially Fauvism and Expressionism. Each jewellery piece begins as a detailed deconstruction of an original work, rebuilding each new piece with inspired details - using sterling silver and colourful resins for their contrasting opacity and vibrant colours.


Dominique Audette

Q: What is your origin story?

From the age of 16, in the early 1970s, I started working part-time in a small boutique selling jewellery from Quebec jewellers and artisans. This concept was really unusual at the time. I was confronted with jewellery as a means of creative expression and not as jewellery of a classical style, as we used to see in commercial jewellery stores. It was a revelation for me. I immediately began to draw jewels, and a few years later, I was engaged in a workshop where I trained. After three years, I returned to university and completed a bachelor's degree in art history. I then went back to design and manufacturing, joining another jeweller already in place in Quebec City. It was in the early 80's and we were very active, shops (wholesalers and retailers), and shows. It was during this period that I gradually began to teach - first teaching drawing, then art history and finally manufacturing techniques. After a few years of practice, we had to close the workshop. We were more keen on creation than on management. So I went to work in different workshops in Quebec City, until, little by little, the teaching took up all of my time. I also had my small workshop at home and I worked on jewellery design for special orders and as a subcontractor.

When I started preparing a drawing class, I realized that there were no reference books. So, I had created the course from general drawing concepts that I had adapted to jewellery. The students asked for course notes, but I only had my own notes to submit. So I began to write a book on the subject. In 2006, I published 'Dessin de bijoux' - a book that was then translated and Jewelry Illustration was published by Brynmorgen Press in 2010. Three years later, at the request of my editor, I wrote another book - 'Draw Better', a book about drawing in general, that present the drawings step by step.

I have subsequently completed a bachelor's degree in teaching and I now share my time between teaching and creating.


Hand carved wax models.

Q: Tell us about your work process - what materials and processes do you favour?

My jewellery work techniques do not differ from the traditional methods of working on the bench, tracing, sawing, filing assembling by welding, casting, etc... My creations are distinguished rather by the insertion of resin which allows me to incorporate large masses or colored surfaces, without weighing down the workpiece too much. However, this requires a lot of preparation in the chronological order of the manufacturing steps because each jewel requires a different preparation according to the model and the number of colors. The challenge, therefore, is for small-scale parts to successfully integrate several colors by limiting interventions.


Rough sterling silver castings.

Q: What do you think makes your work unique?

Volume and consistent color.

Q: Where do you gather inspiration?

I feed my creativity by looking at lot of images and photos of all kinds and by visiting museums and galleries. I consider color schemes, volume or textures. Then I take the pencil, let it slide on the page, until an interesting assemblage arises that I rework until a piece of jewellery emerges. I then look at what would be required to technically manufacture it, the steps and feasibility. This method of research results in jewellery with an important graphic aspect, always present.

For a few years now, I have been attracted by the aesthetics of the 20th century, especially Cubism and the 1950s. But I have also been fascinated by the aestheticism of the antiquity and the Middle Ages and in the past my creations were visibly different. Moreover, certain elements of these periods influence today. Who knows what will inspire me in the near future or far away. I let myself be carried. I do not want to be confined to a style. My influences are diverse and very different from one another.

Travel also inspires me a lot. I like to see how the architects appropriate the space and how they mix historical and modern buildings. I love the abundant activity of big cities and the creative audacity that is found there. I love visiting museums to take lessons from the great masters. I always come back from traveling with a crazy desire to draw and create.


Dominique soldering a ring shank.

Q: What artists have inspired you the most - who do you look up to?

First, Picasso. He is my guru. I do not have to explain why; The sculptor Wendell Castle for his imposing volumes with black and satin finishes; The architect Roberto Burle-Marx, for his graphic design; The ceramist Chun-Bok Lee and for the architectural and organic aspect of his works; The multi artist Yayoi Kusama for her colorful madness; The sculptor and architect Isamu Noguchi for his imprint in the 20th century; Flemish painting for the color and purity of the northern light.


Sterling silver and resin ring - part of the BIOPHILIA exhibition.
Photo by John Kane Photography

Q: What are the most valuable lessons you’ve learned from working in the industry?

Believe in what you do. Trust yourself. Defend your point of view.

Q: What tips do you have for aspiring designers?

Try hard and persevere. Accept criticism, because it is very constructive. Nevertheless, do not be influenced by what customers ask. It is up to the jeweller to influence his client and impose his style. More prosaic knowledge of administration and taxation. Otherwise, partner with someone reliable for this less sexy aspect of the craft.

A big thank you to Dominique for inspiring us with their design journey! For more examples of Dominiques's work click here. Dominique is part of the exhibition "BIOPHILIA: Expressions in Metal", click here to find out more.

January 30, 2017

At 18Karat, we are proud to have an amazing studio where we can create new and original pieces every day, but are also exceptionally proud of our gallery. Our store features rotating exhibitions of lovely pieces by Canadian artist from coast to coast. To highlight the amazing talent that we have in the gallery we will be featuring one of our artist every month. This month starting with our very own master goldsmith Dino Giannetti.



At the age of 14 years old, Dino grew a passion for goldsmithing from working alongside his father, Tullio, who became a master goldsmith after emigrating from Italy in 1950. His passion became so apparent at the age of 16, that he went to Italy to apprenticed under another master goldsmith, Armando Ruggeri. With all the knowledge bestowed upon him by Armando, Dino returned to Canada to turn their home-based jewellery business into a store. Many people were skeptical at first in trusting a child with their jewellery requests, it didn't take long for their clients to understand that Dino's talent was that of a true craftsman.

The Natura Ring - a masterpiece in miniature.

The majority of jewellery is created using computer-aided design programs to create digital models that are then created in 3D. It guarantees a precision and detail, but lacks the artistry of the human hand. This ring, like the majority of Dino Giannetti's creations, was hand-carved in wax - yet it's precision rivals that of any CAD program. Every angle refined.

Dino was inspired by the architectural and organic pattens that are often seen together in public spaces - a vine growing along an iron support. Natura is a one of a kind sculptural ring featuring a pyramidal Lepidocrocite. This ring won the 2012 Award Winning Excellence in Design.

DESCRIPTION 18k rose and white gold Diamonds Lepidocrocite For more examples of Dino's work, visit Dino Giannetti under CANADIAN ARTISTS menu.


DINO GIANNETTI

January 30, 2017

At 18Karat, we are proud to have an amazing studio where we can create new and original pieces every day, but are also exceptionally proud of our gallery. Our store features rotating exhibitions of lovely pieces by Canadian artist from coast to coast. To highlight the amazing talent that we have in the gallery we will be featuring one of our artist every month. This month starting with our very own master goldsmith Dino Giannetti.



At the age of 14 years old, Dino grew a passion for goldsmithing from working alongside his father, Tullio, who became a master goldsmith after emigrating from Italy in 1950. His passion became so apparent at the age of 16, that he went to Italy to apprenticed under another master goldsmith, Armando Ruggeri. With all the knowledge bestowed upon him by Armando, Dino returned to Canada to turn their home-based jewellery business into a store. Many people were skeptical at first in trusting a child with their jewellery requests, it didn't take long for their clients to understand that Dino's talent was that of a true craftsman.

The Natura Ring - a masterpiece in miniature.

The majority of jewellery is created using computer-aided design programs to create digital models that are then created in 3D. It guarantees a precision and detail, but lacks the artistry of the human hand. This ring, like the majority of Dino Giannetti's creations, was hand-carved in wax - yet it's precision rivals that of any CAD program. Every angle refined.

Dino was inspired by the architectural and organic pattens that are often seen together in public spaces - a vine growing along an iron support. Natura is a one of a kind sculptural ring featuring a pyramidal Lepidocrocite. This ring won the 2012 Award Winning Excellence in Design.

DESCRIPTION
18k rose and white gold
Diamonds
Lepidocrocite

For more examples of Dino's work, visit Dino Giannetti under CANADIAN ARTISTS menu.


CAROLINE ARBOUR

July 31, 2018

Brilliant, brave and strong - Caroline Arbour is inspired by not just the appearance of the beetle, but also by what it has represented throughout history. Fascinated by their agility, their colours and their anatomy these creatures have come to play a creative role in Caroline’s life and work that is both mystical and mythical.


Caroline Arbour of SCARO

“As a contemporary jeweler, the beetle is my alter ego. As an artist, I am sensitive to my surroundings and fragile at times. And as a businesswoman, I have little room for this sensitivity. The beetle’s shell is mine and it protects me. The beetle’s shell does not prevent it from shining, from being proud and hardworking.”

Q: What is your origin story?

There are moments that change our lives. One such moment was my discovery of the beetle, the coleopterous insect that took an unlikely place in my life. Even my business is no exception and is called SCARO, a combination of scarab and Caroline. I was studying jewelry-making at the Pavillon technique in Quebec City when I spotted this extraordinary creature. On a beautiful summer day, I saw a beetle walking calmly along the hot asphalt. Fascinated by its agility, I stopped the car that was about to run it over. I bent down to pick up this long-horned beetle, hid it in the palm of my hand and observed it for several minutes. Brown in texture with motifs, somewhat shiny, brave and strong. From then on, the jewelry I sculpted would be in the form of beetles. It is more than just a simple fascination; I grew to respect this mythical and mystical insect. As a contemporary jeweler, the beetle is my alter ego. As an artist, I am sensitive to my surroundings and fragile at times. The beetle’s shell is mine and it protects me. The beetle’s shell does not prevent it from shining, from being proud and hardworking. Like the beetle, when I am confident, I break out of my shell and spread my wings. This is when I may seem a little clumsy and maybe even a bit loud, like the beetle who, while flying, notices the buzzing sound of his wings beating against his shell. But he keeps going and manages to reach his target. That's the image of a beetle flying free! Since 1998, the beetle has followed me everywhere…I have even tattooed it on my skin! Every day I sculpt, shape and polish them and insert precious stones. Each day I wear it proudly as one of my creations. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do.


Genuine beetle elytra.

Q: How did you first get started making jewellery?

When I was young, one night I dreamed about making jewelry. I was already a very creative kid but from that night, I knew that this was my destiny to create jewelry and it was going to be my way to express myself to the world.

Q: Tell us about your work process - what materials and processes do you favour?

SCARO jewelry is entirely handmade in Quebec in my workshop in Abitibi-Témiscamingue. To obtain the desired effects, I work my metals using one or both of the following traditional techniques:
Lost Wax: Using this technique, I create complex shapes and volumes. Skilled in sculpture, I favour this technique to sculpt beetle’s bodies, but also to produce very detailed rings and bangles. Pendants, bracelets, earrings and other jewelry can also be made using this thousand-year-old technique.
Directly in the metal: Using a nugget, I create an ingot that I will transform into a plaque or a thread of different thicknesses. I use this technique for many of my creations. This method requires many tools and a lot of patience and dexterity. I also regularly combine these two techniques to make a single item of jewelry, such as my beetles, where the legs and setting are made in the metal itself and the body is made in lost wax.


Galuchat Necklace - Stingray leather is fascinating in its great beauty and toughness - a mix of force and elegance.

Q: What do you think makes your work unique?

My emblem, the beetle. For SCARO, the beetle is a good-luck charm. It symbolizes inner strength, with its shell serving as a protector and invoking courage. The insertion of genuine beetle elytra with iridescent highlights in SCARO’s jewellery adds a touch of real magic. I hope that my creations will bring strength and happiness. As for a good-luck charm, I mould my beetles so that each of them envelops beauty, courage and abundance for those who wear them. SCARO is more than jewelry – it is also an emotion to be worn…

Q: Where do you gather inspiration?

With my sharp eye and endlessly renewed inspiration, I harness the fragile, poetic beauty of my surroundings. While insects are the focus of my fascination with living beings, I also see beauty in the variegated textures of plant life that I transform, through filing, moulding and welding, into jewellery or works of art, forged in precious metals. I really enjoy playing with contrasts, mixing smooth, round pearls with rougher materials and textures.


Caroline hand-sculpting a beetle ring.

Q: What artists have inspired you the most - who do you look up to?

I am fascinated by the extravagance of haute couture and the excesses the fashion world indulges in. I like free, strong and daring spirits like Jean-Paul Gaultier who is a passionate and uncompromising being. I always admired as well the work of Boucheron and Lalique who are significant sources of inspiration for me.


Q: What are the most valuable lessons you’ve learned from working in the industry?

Don’t follow the trends, trust your own instinct.

Q: What tips do you have for aspiring designers?

Always remains authentic.

Q: Do you have a motto or a credo - something that defines your work?

Life is more intense and fulfilling when you do not care about what others think.

A big thank you to Caroline for inspiring us with your design journey! For more examples of Caroline's work click here. Caroline is part of the exhibition "BIOPHILIA: Expressions in Metal", click here to find out more.

CARLOS SOTO


JOHN CARNES


DEBORAH VIVAS


JANIS KERMAN


PETRA LUZ


JASPER JENSEN


DOMINIQUE AUDETTE


BANDE DES QUATRES


BAYOT HEER


CHRISTINE DWAYNE


CLAUDIO PINO


LINDA BROWN


MEREDITH ROBB


18Karat Studio+GalleryARTIST ARCHIVE